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9th Seat http://www.9thseat.com the brainchild of Mary Whipple, Olympic gold medalist coxswain of the US women's eight. Here you'll find informative blog posts, tips and tricks, and opportunities to learn from the best! Tue, 01 Jul 2014 18:42:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Row in the Moment http://www.9thseat.com/advanced-coxswain/row-moment/ http://www.9thseat.com/advanced-coxswain/row-moment/#comments Tue, 29 Apr 2014 21:13:02 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=789 Rowing is just as mental as it is physical. Racing season is here and being present each stroke will lead to fast racing. Is your team ready for racing with a winning attitude? Mental toughness and creating a boat identity will lead to fast races.

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Row in the moment

Row in the moment

I came across this article that has nothing to do with rowing but everything to do with the mind set of being present and loving what you do.  For us that is rowing. This article is titled, “Shutting off the Excuse Machine.” I know we’ve all had excuses on why a practice or workout didn’t go how we planned or had hoped it would feel.

http://www.adventure-journal.com/2014/04/shutting-off-the-excuse-machine/

As we are in the smack-dab middle of racing season and reality has set in of how fast your team is currently I challenge you to stop comparing your team to others.  Stop trying to beat other teams but rather enjoy the rows and races you have left of spring.  You only get to experience this season once and each race once.  Stop trying to compare it to what you think or how you think it should go and be present every stroke, every practice, and every 3rd 500!

I challenge you the next time you are about to line up for a race piece or the next time you are at the starting line of a race, look left, then right, then directly forward.  Row to what you can become as a team and see how fast you can make your own boat in your own lane.

Enjoy the journey and send it!

Steer Straight,

 

mwhip+

 

 

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Coxswain Leadership Camp: Spatial Awareness http://www.9thseat.com/coxswain-questions-answers/coxswain-leadership-camp-spatial-awareness/ http://www.9thseat.com/coxswain-questions-answers/coxswain-leadership-camp-spatial-awareness/#comments Tue, 15 Apr 2014 00:51:59 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=766 I know many coxswains who are great motivators but don't get boated because they can't maneuver their boat well enough. It is very important to coaches to trust their coxswains. The coxswains who are in the right place at the right time are true leaders. Summer camp is a great way to take the time to study and learn the skills that coxswains never have enough time to practice during practice.

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9th seat flyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another question asked and answered…

 

This one is a tricky one because we have so much to do in our seat. We work on spatial awareness and situational awareness a ton at my Coxswain Leadership Camp because I think it is a very important skill that doesn’t get taught enough during practice.

 

Q: Next year I’m going to be a coxswain and I was wondering when you first start out what is the most important thing to remember?

A: Having the ability to maneuver your boat well will separate you from other coxswains regardless if you are a novice or not. Knowing where you physically are on your body of water verses where you need to be, then choosing the safest and most efficient way to get there is a great goal to master during your first year of coxing.

I know many coxswains who are great motivators but don’t get boated because they can’t maneuver their boat well enough. Coaches value this skill over being a motivator because it is that important.

Summer camp is a great way to take the time to study and learn the skills that coxswains never have enough time to practice during practice. For more info on my Coxswain Leadership Camp or Mwhip+ Rowing Leadership Camp click here!

 

Steer Straight!

mwhip+

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Mary Whipple’s Rowing and Coxing Summer Camp FAQ http://www.9thseat.com/news/mary-whipples-rowing-coxing-summer-camp-faq/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/mary-whipples-rowing-coxing-summer-camp-faq/#comments Tue, 01 Apr 2014 00:18:10 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=755 You've got questions about my coxing and rowing camps? I've got answers. This is a working page and I will update it with any new answers to all your questions.

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The 9th Seat

FAQ (in progress)

 

Travel/Transportation

 

Q: Will I be able to arrive a day early/stay an extra night? 

Campers will have an option to arrive Sunday evening due to flight schedules.  There will be a fee associated with reserving any additional nights stay that is set by the University of Washington’s housing services.  The cost of a double occupancy room is $41.50 and for a single occupancy $75. Shoot me an email to reserve any extra days or discuss travel plans and payment options for the early and late departure fee.  Most likely, paying by check will be preferred for the extra fees but a special arrangement to pay by credit card could happen as well.

 

Q: What time should I fly in on Monday? I don’t want to miss any minute of camp.

Camp starts at 1pm on Monday.  Campers flying from the east coast should book the first flights out in order to make it.  The first hour or so is orientation and team building activities.

 

Q: What time can I book my departure flight? 

Camp ends with a BBQ at Conibear Shellhouse from 1pm-3pm.  We are using a shuttle service for airport departure.  Campers can book their flights anytime around 5pm or later.  We just want to make sure there is enough time for campers to leave with a full stomach so use your best judgement of what flights make sense and are most economical.

 

Q: Is there transportation to/from the airport? 

This year we will be using Shuttle Express for our airport transportation needs.  Campers will be responsible to book their transportation.  Once your flights are booked more information will  be given to help assist making shuttle reservations as to where to make the drop off location.  The two drop off options will be the dorm or the boathouse depending on time of arrival.

 

Q: My child will be traveling alone, will there be someone at the airport waiting? 

Absolutely.  A staff member will be present at the airport hanging around baggage claim to make sure campers navigate the airport and will know where to go to catch their shared van from Shuttle Express.

 

Rowing Camp 

 

Q: Is this a University of Washington summer camp or Mary Whipple’s rowing camp?  

My rowing camp will take place at the University of Washington where campers will have the same access to equipment and facility that Washington’s Division I student-athletes have.  Rising seniors will also have the opportunity to meet with the University of Washington coaches during camp.  This rowing camp is acting as the unofficial official University of Washington’s junior women’s rowing camp.  It’s a great way to get the feel of what it would be like to row for the University of Washington.

 

Q: Who will be coaching my daughter?

I have recruited some of the biggest names in the women’s rowing world.  My 2008 Olympic teammates in the women’s eight will help coach.  Lindsay Shoop (2-seat), Anna Goodale (3-seat), and Erin Cafaro (bow seat) will all be present during the first rowing week, July 14th-18th.  Anna Cummins (5 seat) will make occasional appearance both weeks.  For the second week Goodale, Cummins and I will be the coaches.  I along with these Olympic Champions want to inspire the next generation of women rowers.

 

Q: How much does the camp cost? 

The Coxswain Leadership camp costs $1950.

The Rowing Camp at the University of Washington costs $1250

 

Q: Why the cost difference between the two camps? 

The Coxswain leadership camp is limited to only 20 coxswains to ensure a 5 to 1 coach to student ratio for quality coxswain instruction.  Each camper will have the opportunity to work directly with me within the group setting when we listen and constructively critique campers audio examples.

The Rowing Camp at the University of Washington will have a slightly higher maximum of 26 rowers and 5 coxswains for a 7 to 1 coach to student ratio.

Olympic Champions are leading these two camps and coaching the next generation of women rowers to a new level.

 

Q: Can I pay in installments?

Absolutely.  You can have the option of sending in check payments or I can set up a payment plan through Regatta Central.  Just message me and we’ll make a plan together.

 

Q: Will the topic of getting recruited or how to get recruited be addressed at either camp?

Absolutely.  I’ve formed a relationship with The Rower’s Edge who have provided high school rowers and coxswains advice on how to get recruited.  They pride themselves on confidentiality and love it when college coaches don’t realize one of their clients are on their team.  These women will Skype in to give a short informative, “How To” on the basics of recruiting.

 

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University of Washington Women’s Junior Rowing Camp http://www.9thseat.com/news/university-washington-womens-junior-rowing-camp/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/university-washington-womens-junior-rowing-camp/#comments Mon, 24 Mar 2014 17:21:15 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=731 The 9th Seat is not just for coxswains ;) I'm expanding my summer camp program to include two-one week rowing camps that will allow junior athletes a chance to train like a national team athlete at the University of Washington boathouse, Conibear Shellhouse.

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Husky Stadium This summer I’m expanding my summer camp schedule to include two rowing camps for high school age women.  26 rowers and five coxswains will have the chance to see what it is like to train with me on the University of Washington’s campus at the Conibear Shellhouse.  Bob Ernst has always wanted a rowing camp at Conibear and he has chosen me to run the week long camps for junior women.

 

Rowers can expect the best coaching from some of my Olympic teammates from Beijing and London.

During camp, rowers can expect:

  • Exposure to new rowing techniques
  • Mental toughness tricks
  • Strength and conditioning
  • Nutrition
  • Leadership skills

 

Coxswains can expect the best coaching from me while in the coxswain seat as well as gain insight from rowers in what they need from coxswains.

During camp, coxswains can expect:

  • Exposure to new rowing techniques
  • Mental toughness tricks
  • Strength and conditioning
  • Nutrition
  • Leadership skills
  • …basically everything the rowers are getting plus more!

For more information visit this page.

To register for this camp click here.

Rowing week 1: July 14th-18th

Rowing week 2: July 28-Aug 1st

 

Steer Straight and Row Harder ;)

–mwhip+

**A FAQ about his camp is coming soon as well as an announcement regarding the coaches for this camp.

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Fall Update: How to Avoid and Recover from Head Race Collisions http://www.9thseat.com/news/fall-update-how-to-avoid-and-recover-from-head-race-collisions/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/fall-update-how-to-avoid-and-recover-from-head-race-collisions/#comments Tue, 15 Oct 2013 19:49:22 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=660 Fall rowing means longer mileage and Head Races on tricky courses. Here is a fall update and advice for avoiding mid-race collisions and recovering with the cleanest line.

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“Tis the season for all things fall.  The first thing that comes my mind in the fall is Head Racing.  This weekend the Head of the Charles is going off and I wanted to wish you all luck and give you a few words of advice if you find yourself in the middle of a bad situation.

Here is a brief video I made as I took a little break from a day of fishing.  I hope this starts the conversation off of how to become better self aware during chaotic situation.  Does anyone have a great story of how they avoided a collision during a race? Please feel free to share in the comment box below.

Fall Update: How to Avoid or Recover from Head Race Collisions

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pI1n66x5kdk

Also, I compiled a short playlist of collisions which I feel could have been avoided had the coxswain looked around sooner and either slow/stopped their boat or chose to go around a crazy situation.  We all want to be as fast as possible out on the race course but a wide turn is better than a collision.  For anyone in these videos below, I bet you’ve got some great stories to share! Please click on the link below for the playlist.

How Not To Collide Playlist

Lastly, check out my old blog post about how to race the Head of the Charles, here, and if you want a cram session of how to take the perfect line, check out the video that the Head of the Charles Regatta produced for coxswains below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yEnO2kU6Hw

 

Have fun and use the rudder for good this fall season!

 

mwhip+

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http://www.9thseat.com/news/fall-update-how-to-avoid-and-recover-from-head-race-collisions/feed/ 0 How To Avoid and Recover Head Race Collisions Fall rowing means Head Races on tricky courses. Mary Whipple offers advice for avoiding mid-race collisions and recovering with the cleanest line. Head Race, Collisions, avoiding collisions, HOCR, Head of the Charles, Fall Racing
2014 San Diego Crew Classic Coxswain Clinic http://www.9thseat.com/news/coxswain-clinics-at-san-diego-crew-classic/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/coxswain-clinics-at-san-diego-crew-classic/#comments Fri, 15 Mar 2013 03:30:37 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=606 I've always wanted to offer coxing clinics at the San Diego Crew Classic because it is a tough but rewarding course to navigate. I'm offering two options: (1) small group session and (2) One-on-one session. Kick off this racing season right and get dialed!

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crew classic image

I’m headed back to the Crew Classic!  Last year in my opinion was a huge success.  There were two group sessions and four one-on-one sessions that happened last year.  So this year I’m adding an additional group session right after the coxswain clinic at 5pm on Friday.

The San Diego Crew Classic holds a special place in my heart.  Over my rowing career I have been lucky enough to race at the crew classic 7 times and coach a crew of masters women to race and win their E category. The Crew Classic is a tough but rewarding course to navigate which has inspired me to hold coxswain clinics at the race course.

Challenges you’ll find at the Crew Classic

  • beach launching
  • organizing the sometime long trek down to the beach launching
  • tide
  • choppy water
  • salt water
  • sail boats as stake boats
  • distraction of Sea World
  • losing focus of the buoy line and getting on a diagonal
  • getting caught off guard from the cross wind
  • dealing with probably your first 6-boats across race of the season

In addition to addressing the craziness of the course we will get into the nitty gritty of spring sprint racing.  I’m giving two different kinds of clinics during the racing weekend. So kick off the new racing season right and get dialed.

The course

Option #1: Small Group Racing Clinic

When:

Max: 10 coxswains each session

Open to all age groups and levels

Registration: Click on the times above or click on this link, Regatta Central, and scroll down to the 9th Seat logo.

This small group clinic will allow for a round table discussion atmosphere.  I want to make sure that all coxswains attending will receive personal attention while having the opportunity to learn from other coxswain’s style and questions.  We’ll listen to all audio examples brought to the session as well as some of my race tapes.  The goal for this session is to leave feeling ready to race and confident that your words will make your teammates better and your boat faster.

At the clinic you’ll get a 9th Seat t-shirt with the new and improved 9th Seat logo!

 

Please bring:

  • an audio example of either a practice race piece or a full blown race (head cam footage is good too)
  • notebook
  • three goals you want to achieve this race season
  • questions!

 

What We’ll Cover:

  • handling Crew Classic Challenges
  • race strategy
  • filtering information
  • motivation
  • steering
  • situational awareness

crew classic course overhead

Option #2: One-on-One Session

When:

  • Friday, April 4th
  • Saturday, April 6th
  • Other times may be available upon request. Feel free to email me! (scroll down and fill in the text boxes)

Open to all age groups

Registration: Click on the times above  or click on this link, Regatta Central, and scroll down to the 9th Seat logo.

 

One-on-one sessions are great because it gives you the power to steer the conversation to meet your needs.   Bring as many audio examples you have or want to share with me and your race plans and we’ll talk some major shop.  I’ll provide you with a questionnaire before hand and you’ll submit me your first choice of audio or head cam footage you want to make sure we cover during the session. I want to be prepped and ready to utilize our full hour session to help make you a better leader, decision maker, and racer.

The best part about this One-on-One session is that we’ll have a complimentary follow up session via Skype to review your race at the Crew Classic to see the changes you made and to create new goals to help you continue to expand your skills in the 9th seat!

In addition to learning all my tips and tricks you’ll get a 9th Seat t-shirt. You’ll also get a 10% discount to my summer camp this July!

 

Steer Straight and I’ll see you in San Diego!

 

Mwhip+

 

San Diego Crew Classic Group Coxswain Clinic

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4 Tips for Winter Training Camps http://www.9thseat.com/advanced-coxswain/4-tips-for-winter-training-camps/ http://www.9thseat.com/advanced-coxswain/4-tips-for-winter-training-camps/#comments Fri, 11 Jan 2013 23:53:36 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=549 Earning your seat for spring racing happens during practice. If you don't like where you ended this fall use winter to get better. Most collegiate teams go on winter training trips so use those trips to get back to basics. These 4 tips will help you organize your approach to getting better in the 9th Seat.

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Q:  Being a recruited freshman coxswain to my university I got there and was ready to start. And found out I had a medical issue. I went the entire fall season not practicing with my team because I was not allowed to. I am allowed to practice starting with our winter training trip. I am nervous and I want to prove to the coaches that I am the coxswain they recruited. Whats your advice for a coxswain that has been on a team for an entire fall season and is just allowed to start up!? Thank you!!!

 

A:   It is perfectly normal to be nervous for your first couple of practice on the water.  Just remember why you love coxing and make sure that comes out in the first couple of practices.  You will make mistakes and when you do shrug it off and quickly move on to the right decision or direction.  Your goal for the first couple of practice on winter training camps should be about executing efficient boat maneuverability and executing your coaches directions as efficiently as possible.

 

For the first two water sessions I would:

  • Focus on steering straight
  • Notice technical focuses and changes
  • Get your boat spun and headed where it needs to be first
  • Then think about motivation

**Accuracy on execution of the workout should get you more coxswain street cred than cheerleading!

 

By the time your winter training camp is in full swing and short race pieces are being worked into practice you’ll be ready to handle all of the above bulleted items in addition to adding your personality and the vibe of your team’s goals into your motivations.  Never sacrifice accuracy and steering for motivating.  Use winter training trips to help you prepare for when you return to campus and start training for spring races.  That way the first day of practice back at home to start where you left off at winter training camp.

 

Steer Straight!

 

mwhip+

 

 

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New Jersey: Only the Strong Survive http://www.9thseat.com/news/new-jersey-only-the-strong-survive/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/new-jersey-only-the-strong-survive/#comments Fri, 04 Jan 2013 00:06:09 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=535 It's been two months since Hurricane Sandy. The Jersey Shore has been a great day off adventure to all the National Team rowers training at the Princeton Training Center. Two members of the rowing community have chosen to help those affected by the storm. Please join me in helping this great non-profit give back to the small businesses that have made the Jersey Shore a fun day off from day to day stress of training for the Olympics.

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Since moving back to Washington I’ve had to answer two basic questions when meeting someone for the first time.

  1. Where did you move from?
  2. What do you do?

This is all of course before dropping the Olympic bombshell upon meeting someone for the first time.  You see, I feel that I want to have the person get to know me as just plain ‘ole Mary before knowing what I’ve gotten to do and accomplish over the last better half of my life.

So the answer to the first question is, “I’ve recently moved from Princeton, NJ.

I’ve been living in New Jersey on and off for the past 12 years which sounds crazy to this West Coast girl.  I’ve gained some perspective since leaving that New Jersey is not the “arm pit of America” but truly is the “Garden State.”

On our afternoons off from training a bunch of us would drive east to the shore which I made plenty of exit errors because again to this West Coast girl, you head west to the beach not east!  Spending our time off at the shore reminded me of all the great things New Jersey has to offer.  Pizza by the slice,  home made ice cream parlors, and spending the night at friend’s shore houses are experiences that I will always remember.

So after Hurricane Sandy hit and destroyed most of the shore area my two friends Melissa Klepacki and Ali Cox formed a non-profit called Restore our Shore.  All money raised gets given out as grants to local businesses affected by the storm.  Their goal is to have a zero balance after every giving period.  So when asked to help out a place I’ve driven to countless of times to get a refreshing break from all the training stresses, it was a no-brainer.  After two months since the storm please keep those affected by Hurricane Sandy in your thoughts and prayers and for those who feel moved to do something to help please donate like I did.

 

As for answering question #2, that is a whole other blog post!

 

Steer Straight,

 

mwhip+

 

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The Olympian I Was, Am, and Want to Be: Part II http://www.9thseat.com/news/the-olympian-i-was-am-and-want-to-be-part-ii/ http://www.9thseat.com/news/the-olympian-i-was-am-and-want-to-be-part-ii/#comments Mon, 25 Jun 2012 15:45:55 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=516 Upon reflecting how the Beijing Olympics have shaped me into the Olympian I am today, I've learned that you have to enjoy the journey and believe in the process to be able to reach the destination you've envisioned.

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Today is the naming date for the London Olympics.  There are six hours left until the names have to be officially turned in.  Olympic selection is brutal.  As I said in part one of this three-part blog series, each blog is about the different Olympic cycles I have participated in; Athens, Beijing, and London.  I remember the naming date for Beijing well.  The morning of it we were seat racing for the final position in the boat.  We all had our roles to do regardless if we were directly getting switched.  Each one of us wanted the fastest line up, period.  It’s moments like seat racing for final Olympic selection that brings out a level of commitment to the process and professionalism.

 

For me, I knew what was at stake because of my experience from Athens.  I knew that I needed to be consistent with my calls emotionally and that the stroke rate and rhythm needed to be accurate between all pieces.  That kind of professionalism allowed us to find the right combination of athletes for the Beijing Olympics. We were being true to the process.  That combination brought six young guns and three veterans together.  Caryn, Anna and I brought the characteristics and foundation from the Athens Olympic cycle and the young guns picked up on that attitude and ran away with it.  That sense of motivating each other to build a level of excitement and trust was a special team dynamic.  As one of the leaders in that boat I made sure the mix of experienced and rookie attitude formed into one goal that I communicated to them the whole way down the race course.

 

The Beijing cycle shaped me into the Olympian I am today.  It gave me the experience to confidently say that success is about the journey and not ultimately about the destination.  Having that Olympic Gold medal represents more to me now than just winning a race. When I look at my Beijing medal I see more than Gold, I remember every step of the journey that it took to get to the middle of the podium. I get it now when people say that they are excited to go to work every day.  Or that they can’t believe they get paid to do the job that they do.  Well, I might not be getting paid wages in that regard, but I can’t believe I have been given the opportunities that I have had through the sport of rowing.  Now as an Olympian I get to share those experiences of leadership, teamwork and motivations to people from all walks of life.

 

The best memory from Beijing that will stay forever with me is the excitement I had to race with my teammates on the day of the final.  We weren’t afraid to execute the race we knew we had in us.  There were plenty of nerves, but the kind that were more out of anticipation.  The feeling of wanting to be no where else but at that start line with 8 other women you completely had faith in will never leave me.

 

Tonight the nominations will be submitted for the 2012 Olympic Rowing Team and by tomorrow the athletes nominated will finally be able to answer the question they have been dodging for four years, “Are you going to race in the Olympics?” Tomorrow their answer will be, “YES, I am going to compete in the Olympics!”

 

Good Luck to all the US rowers fighting for their Olympic dream!

 

mwhip+

 

 

 

 

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How to be a better coxswain? Become an Athlete. http://www.9thseat.com/coxswain-training/how-to-be-a-better-coxswain-become-an-athlete/ http://www.9thseat.com/coxswain-training/how-to-be-a-better-coxswain-become-an-athlete/#comments Sat, 16 Jun 2012 19:22:42 +0000 http://www.9thseat.com/?p=488 Becoming more athletically minded will help you be a better coxswain. This summer choose to be a better athlete. Here is my attempt at becoming a better athlete by learning to be a smarter runner and dead lifter!

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Many coxswains ask me about what summer camps I think are good.  I am not working with a summer camp this year so I’m not sure how to answer this question.  I do know that coxswains need to make sure that there is a dedicated coach for them at the summer camp they choose to attend.  Being coached by someone new will help you learn how to adapt to new situations and I think that is an important trait a coxswain needs to master.  Every crew is different and every session has a different feel and goal.  Learning how to adapt and change to what the coach is asking you to do and changing to the needs of your crew will help you become a better coxswain.

I also believe that you do not necessarily need to attend a summer camp to become a better coxswain.  If I had to choose between attending a rowing summer camp or a camp where I could learn to be a better athlete, I would choose a camp where I could test my athletic abilities.  If you need to become a better motivator then put yourself into a situation where you need to talk yourself through a physical challenge.  If you want to become sharper in your decision skills then put yourself in a stressful environment where you have to make split second decisions.  Lastly, if you need to make sure you stay at coxswain weight put yourself in an environment that will allow you to stay active in a fun way.

Last Friday in between practices I decided to take a running clinic given by my new good friend Brian MacKenzie who founded Crossfit Endurance.  While my teammates rest in between practices I usually use that time to squeeze in my workout for the day.  I technically don’t have to workout, I am at coxswain weight naturally thanks to my wonderful parents giving me the right metabolism and body for coxing.  (Thanks Mom and Dad!)  I, however, feel motivated and inspired by my teammates to stay fit especially for the odd days when weather keeps us on land and a team “jog” (which is really a full on run for me)  is scheduled for practice.  I want to make sure I’m ready to workout with the team and lift with the team.  It helps me experience a small glimpse of what they go through so when I have to ask for more during a workout on the water they know I am fully aware of what I’m asking them to do.

So, this summer I challenge you to stay active so you can show up to your first crew practice a better athlete and better athletically minded. Getting coached how to move your own body helps you become a better coxswain. Especially if you pay attention to how your coach is instructing you.  You might like how they tell you what to do or you might not like how they instruct you.  Either way you are learning how you like to be communicated to while you are working out.  A good coxswain would take note of the good and bad advice they receive and then bring some of that good coaching into the coxswain seat, the 9th seat.

Below is some of what I was learning while taking that running clinic from Brian. I learned that I was a heel striker and how to fix it.  I also learned how to do a prober dead lift.  Above all, this is me trying to be more athletic!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7UIIHddtk4

Keep a look out for more information about my coxswain only summer camp coming in 2013.  Athletic coxswains wanted!  ;-)

Steer Straight!

Mwhip+

The post How to be a better coxswain? Become an Athlete. appeared first on 9th Seat.

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http://www.9thseat.com/coxswain-training/how-to-be-a-better-coxswain-become-an-athlete/feed/ 4 How to be a better coxswain? Become an Athlete. - 9th Seat   Many coxswains ask me about what summer camps I think are good.  I am not working with a summer camp this year so I'm not sure how to answer this question.  I do know that coxswains need to make sure that there is a dedicated coach for them at the summer camp they choose to attend.  Being athlete,coxing,coxswain,coxswain training,crossfit,training Coxswain Toss in Bled 2011